• Course Descriptions

    Historical Influences on Popular Culture:
     
    This is a projects-based course that utilizes aspects of the humanities, critical analysis, and literature to enrich student learning with an in-depth focus on history and geography. Students will consistently examine primary and secondary sources to analyze cultures, religions, laws, and pivotal events across hemispheres. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and writing in coordination with a thematic view of history. 
     
     
    Current Events:

     
    This course utilizes an array of documentation and media at the local, state, national, and international levels to provide an aid in understanding the importance of daily events and their affects on both the individual and the society as a whole. Items are examined with the intent of interpreting the significance of these events and to place them within a historical perspective, analyzing any possible future implications of each.
     
     

    MODERN HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY:

     

    This course utilizes both formal tests and projects to enrich student learning in the area of Modern History (from 1945 to the present). Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and writing in coordination with a thematic view of the Modern World. Subject matter includes the growth of industry, the Cultural Revolution, the Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam, Watergate, significant Supreme Court decisions, the break up of the Soviet Union, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the rise of Pacific Rim countries, Globalization, Latin America, and conflict in the Middle East. Additionally, students will study the basic fundamentals of economics, compare various government and economic systems, consider world views across cultural lines, explore both personal and public finance issues, and investigate how current political policies relate to their personal lives.

     

     

    CIVICS:
     

    This is a semester course in which students will actively analyze the development and implementation of the American system of government at the local, state, and national levels, as well as the impact of each level of government’s resulting policies on groups, individuals, and themselves. Students will use primary documents, assess videos, conduct research, debate, and critically evaluate news media to formulate their own opinions while appreciating those of others.

     

     
     
    ECONOMICS:
     
    Economics is a semester course that introduces students to the American economic system as it applies to all levels of government and its impact on the individual. Students will also learn the fundamentals of personal and public finance issues, investigate the stock market, balance a checkbook, create a budget, consider credit and debts, buying a car, and the importance of demand on consumers, producers, and government policy in an ever-changing economy.
     
     
     
    WORLD HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY:
     
    This is a projects-based course that utilizes aspects of the humanities, history, and literature to enrich student learning in the area of World History (from prehistory to the Age of Revolutions). Subject matter includes (but is not limited to) prehistory, ancient Egypt and the Middle East, China, India, Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the age of Exploration. Students will consistently examine primary and secondary sources to analyze cultures, religions, laws, and the evolution of the development of “modern” society across hemispheres. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and writing in coordination with a thematic view of history.
     
     
     
    U.S. HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY:
     
    This course utilizes both formal tests and projects to enrich student learning in the area of American (U.S.) History from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and writing in coordination with a thematic view of the Modern World from a U.S. perspective of events. Subject matter includes (but is not limited to) Reconstruction, the growth of industry, war history, political thought and identification, presidential power, Latin America, the Civil Rights Movement, popular culture, imperialism, and conflict in the Middle East. Additionally, students will study the basic fundamentals of economics as it relates to historical themes, compare various government and economic systems, consider world views across cultural lines, explore both personal and public finance issues, and investigate how current political policies relate to their personal lives. 
     
     

Last Modified on August 26, 2014